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Nature finds a way


I did not know that anteaters could do that... I want to see pictures of the baby Archie!





GREENWICH, Conn. (AP) — An anteater has given birth at a Connecticut conservation center, prompting officials there to wonder how the mother conceived.

Officials at the LEO Zoological Conservation Center tell the Greenwich Time  they had removed the only male anteater from the enclosure in August, long before the six-month gestation period for baby Archie would have begun.

They feared that male, Alf, would kill another baby in the pen.

That left the mother Armani, and the young female, Alice, in the enclosure.

But little Archie was born in April anyway.

Marcella Leone, founder and director of the conservation center, suspects this might be a rare case of delayed implantation, when fertilized eggs remain dormant in the uterus for a period of time.

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( 12 comments — Leave a comment )
anteros_lmc
May. 18th, 2013 12:40 am (UTC)
Your wish is my command!



Archie...Greenwich...How perfect! :)

Edited at 2013-05-18 12:40 am (UTC)
eglantine_br
May. 18th, 2013 12:45 am (UTC)
Oh look he is so sweet! Look at his tiny ear!

I love anteaters. There was a company in Illiois that would bring them to your house for birthday parties. (Kind of like how some people rent a pony.)

We never did it, of course. But I always wanted to. I am sure tiny Archie will have a whole lot of admiring fans.
eglantine_br
May. 18th, 2013 01:02 am (UTC)
looked up in wiki-- I thought I remembered reading that some critters do this as a result of stress. (Rabbits, maybe)


Wiki says:
'Some mammals that undergo embryonic diapause include rodents, bears, mustelids (e.g. badgers), and marsupials, (e.g. kangaroos). Some groups only have one species that undergoes embryonic diapause, such as the roe deer in the order Artiodactyla.[2]'
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mylodon
May. 18th, 2013 10:21 am (UTC)
It's also a way to ensure the young are born when there's plenty of food.

As Tom Jones would say, it's not unusual. :)
eglantine_br
May. 18th, 2013 01:54 pm (UTC)
Makes human reproduction look downright boring!

(Lyra was in heat again this week. We are saving up to get her spayed.) Was explaining to C about the weird 'I won't ovulate till after' thing cats do.

So many ways to approach the problem.
charliecochrane
May. 18th, 2013 02:04 pm (UTC)
And don't forget those tricksy greenfly with their parthenogenesis.
eglantine_br
May. 19th, 2013 06:25 am (UTC)
Aphids, yes? I think of greenflies as those horrid things that bite you at the beach! I am not sure exactly how they reproduce, but I bet it involves two adults and eventually some yucky larva.

Still-- I should not judge. They probably think we are very weird, even if we are strangely delicious.
charliecochrane
May. 19th, 2013 07:34 am (UTC)
I don't think what we call greenflies would bite you, unless you were a tomato plant.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aphid

Very pally with ants.
anteros_lmc
May. 19th, 2013 10:37 am (UTC)
I must admit, it's quite a talent! XD
anteros_lmc
May. 19th, 2013 10:36 am (UTC)
Rent an anteater?! No way!!! How cool is that? They are such improbably looking creatures, I still an't quite believe they are real. Archie is adorable isn't he? He's very stripy!
provencepuss
May. 18th, 2013 06:17 am (UTC)
I think it's known as virgin birth in some circles!
eglantine_br
May. 18th, 2013 01:58 pm (UTC)
Or at least a 'how-did-that-happen?' birth. I love the way he is holding on with his little hands. And she is looking back at him.
( 12 comments — Leave a comment )