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Marched Away

Title Marched Away

author Eglantine_br

Kyd and Marlowe

Word Count 600


Marched Away


So we found a place to sit, where it was mostly dry, and we could not see the body. We sat, and we waited to be arrested.




We did not talk very much to purpose. Watson's head was still bleeding, the sluggish ooze was clotting in the sunshine with his pale hair stuck to it. It would scar. No matter. Watson was a big man with an easy smile most of the time. And he could write. He could really really write. He did not take the stage himself, so it need not hold him back. I knew Tom Watson of old. Still he shivered, as we waited, pressing his lips into a tight white line.


“Bradley owed John Allyn money--” Watson said, after some time. “Ned did not want his brother misused.” Watson shook his head, winced. “I should have let it go. He was a rascal, but he need not have died for it.”


Christofer, shuddered and gave a small retch. He was not pierced anywhere. He had told me so, but I trusted the truth of my own hands more. I had felt him, briefly but with care. He was not guarding any hidden body hurts. He was not dissembling, to himself or to me. Still, his skin was drawn stark over his cheeks, and his hands were shaking. He had pulled his legs up close and bent. He rested his cheek on his knees, like a boy at the hearth. He had left boyhood behind recently, I realized, recently and incompletely. His fierce words at the tavern had made him seem older, bigger, stronger. And he had been good with his blade. This was the price being taken.


If I asked he would say no. I did not ask. I shuffled my arse over closer to him, and put my arm around his shoulders. He tensed all over, and then I felt him sigh, like giving something up. He burrowed against me.


“You could leave, Kyd,” Watson said. “No need to get caught up in all this. You struck no blow.” They could not leave, of course.


“I am your witness,” I said. “I'll stay.”


I hoped very much that I would not be marched to prison with them. I had left the puppy behind in my rooms. He was a chewer. If I left him too long he would eat my new play. It featured a Danish prince, and I had great hopes of it.


We had been there an hour, before the guard came. We got to our feet, stiff and cold.


“Tell Ned Allyn,” Tom said. They were binding his hands then, and he was bent forward, being tall. His voice was a little muffled.


“Tell him, he'll know what to-- ow!” He glared. “Too tight. My hands are going numb.”


The guard was an a older man, with a red face and a prosperous belly carried low. He was old enough to be the father of all of us. He gave Tom Watson a consoling pat.


“ Sorry lad, S'how it's done.”


Christofer was staring at the ground. He had not struggled, but he had been slow to comply. He was bound all around, therefore, and resembled a rolly pudding.


The old man turned to me.


“I'll not take you now,” he said. “But don't you go far. You can find your friends at Newgate. Bring 'em some food.” He said this last quietly.


And he took them by the elbows and marched them away.



Comments

( 17 comments — Leave a comment )
rikibeth
Oct. 4th, 2012 11:53 pm (UTC)
I don't understand why they didn't just bugger off. Elizabethan policing was spotty, to say the least. Were they that broadly observed by others? Did I forget something?
eglantine_br
Oct. 5th, 2012 12:14 am (UTC)
They were in a fairly busy street. But I wondered about that too. Apparently if they left they were somehow admitting guilt. They would just be executed when found. I am not sure they would have even had what we would now call a trial.

In any case-- they did not leave. They were marched off to Newgate. (it really happened. You can look it up. 'Hog street affray.') Kyd was not there. I just put him there so he can talk about Marlowe. And because I think I am in love with him just a little.

He also did, apparently, write a play about Hamlet. It is now lost, but WS had access to it and indulged in a little fan-fic.

rikibeth
Oct. 5th, 2012 12:20 am (UTC)
I wonder if Kyd's Hamlet also featured Ethel, The Pirate's Daughter?
eglantine_br
Oct. 5th, 2012 12:53 am (UTC)
I am drawing a total stupid blank. Where is that from?
rikibeth
Oct. 5th, 2012 12:57 am (UTC)
Shakespeare in Love. She was the "original" counterpart to Romeo.

B started calling Ethel on Downton Abbey "Ethel, The Pirate's Daughter" and it's stuck in my mind now.
eglantine_br
Oct. 5th, 2012 01:56 am (UTC)
Hee. It makes me laugh because husbands grandfather had a secret wife named Ethel. We did not find out about her until we started doing family research, by which time they had all been dead for years.

Nobody knows anything about her, she is just there in the census, inexplicable. Maybe she was a pirate...
anteros_lmc
Oct. 5th, 2012 05:00 pm (UTC)
You're kidding me? A secret wife called Ethel? How about that!
eglantine_br
Oct. 5th, 2012 06:58 pm (UTC)
I know, weird right. Mike called his dad and said, "Who is Ethel, and dad had never heard of her. She would have been his fathers first wife.

I can only assume she must have died. They were not divorcing people.
anteros_lmc
Oct. 6th, 2012 07:26 pm (UTC)
Unless of course she ran away at to sea.... ;)
eglantine_br
Oct. 6th, 2012 08:06 pm (UTC)
She might well have done that. Or for all I know, she was killed in the molasses flood.
anteros_lmc
Oct. 6th, 2012 10:08 pm (UTC)
Terrible way to go....
amaraal
Oct. 5th, 2012 11:32 am (UTC)
I confess - I'm a bit at a loss here :) Lacking background information :) Who exactly was Watson? Don't blame me - but I had to think of Sherlock Holmes here :) Aaaaah... I'm so ignorant!!!

But as always your writing style is... sell it as a script, when you finished the story. Maybe Mr Law and Mr Downey will make another movie together :)
eglantine_br
Oct. 5th, 2012 11:45 am (UTC)
I know. Halfway through writing it I realized that problem. I had never heard of this Watson before either.

The thing is-- Shakespeare is the only one most of us know well. The others all died very young, or their work was lost somehow.

And I am using last names a lot because they were all named Thomas. I expect they got confused too.

My story, at this point looks as if it will have: Thomas Watson, Thomas Kyd, Thomas Walsingham, and maybe Thomas Kett.

Except for Kett, they all knew each other, and in some form worked together.

I can only hope it will get clearer. Please let me know if it does not.
amaraal
Oct. 6th, 2012 02:06 pm (UTC)
they were all named Thomas
>_< Well, at least the Sherlock Holmes Watson was named John :)

Hmmm... maybe a link to wiki would be great. Or just a few notes. Just to know where we are. I adore you nonetheless. It is such a vast topic! Like bustling through a crowd, and then a crowd long time gone. Respect! :)
But once you are in you can't find the way back so easily, do you?

It's a pity that so many things get lost during the ages. But then - sometimes even rare things re-appear. Recently a lot of stuff Darwin collected on his voyage on the HMS Beagle. So I still have hope something 'spectacular' pops up again :)

Btw: I adore Thomas Walsingham. Geoffrey Rush had been awesome in 'Elisabeth' playing him.
anteros_lmc
Oct. 5th, 2012 04:53 pm (UTC)
I'm really enjoying this :) I don't know enough about any of these men to have any idea where the story will go next, and I am just about managing to get my head round all the various Toms! As long as you don't introduce a cat called Tom we should be okay :P

He tensed all over, and then I felt him sigh, like giving something up.
That's gorgeous, really lovely.

Looking forward to the next installment!
kcwarwick
Oct. 5th, 2012 06:47 pm (UTC)
I think I'm right in saying that the law of 'hue and cry' applied here, which meant that any citizen who witnessed the crime was obliged to assist in detaining or catching the criminal, and handing him over to the authorities - so there was no point in trying to run away. Unless of course they were totally alone in the street at the time of the fight, which is highly unlikely in a place like Hog Lane.
Have you read Charles Nicholl's 'The Reckoning', which contains all sorts of interesting background information on Marlowe, and some on Kyd?
eglantine_br
Oct. 5th, 2012 06:56 pm (UTC)
Yes. I have read it-- Very useful. I think I will return to it many times. Please, if you see any glaring mistakes in my understanding let me know.

I know Kyd was not really in Hog Lane that day--
( 17 comments — Leave a comment )